YawYaw Nyarko
Director, NYU Africa House and NYU Center for Technology and Economic Development (CTED)
Co-Director, NYU Development Research Institute (DRI)
Professor of Economics, NYU
Website: http://www.yawnyarko.com

Yaw Nyarko, a native of Ghana, is a Professor of Economics at New York University (NYU) and the founding Director of NYU’s Africa House.  He is the Director of the NYU Center for Technology and Economic Development, and also the co-Director of the Development Research Institute, the 2009 winner of the BBVA Frontiers in Knowledge Award on Economic Development Cooperation.   His research interests are in the area of Economic Development and Theoretical Economics.   He has worked on models of human capital as engines of economic growth, as well as on the Brain Drain and skills acquisition in the growth process, and is currently engaged in research on Technology and Economic Development.

Professor Nyarko is leading an extensive research study to evaluate the impact of Commodity Exchanges throughout Africa, specifically focusing on the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX), to assess its institutional design and technology systems, and to measure the performance of the market. This independent evaluation will help ECX understand its current value, identify the areas of improvement, and shape the future of the exchange.

He is the current president of the African Econometric Society, and has served as a consultant to many organizations including the World Bank, the United Nations, and the Social Science Research Council. Professor Nyarko is the immediate past Vice Provost of New York University with a portfolio which included the oversight and establishment of campuses of NYU in Africa and around the world.  Yaw Nyarko received a B.A. from the University of Ghana, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from Cornell University.

Publications

Naidu, S., Y. Nyarko and S. Wang (2014). “Worker Mobility in a Global Labor Market: Evidence from the United Arab Emirates”. Working Paper.

Nyarko, Y. (2013). “The Economic Development Benefits of Human Mobility to Source Countries,” The Emirates Centre for Strategic Studies and Research (ECSSR) working paper. Conference Paper prepared for the Labour Mobility – Enabler for Sustainable Development, Abu Dhabi, 14 – 15, May 2013.

Nyarko, Yaw (2012). “The Brain Drain in Africa,”” in the Oxford Companion to Economics in Africa (eds) Ernest Aryeetey, Shanta Devarajan, Ravi Kanbur and Louis Kasekende, Oxford University Press, USA.

Nyarko, Yaw (2011). “The Returns to the Brain Drain and Brain Circulation in Sub-Saharan Africa: Some Computations Using Data from Ghana,” National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper 16813, Boston USA.

Nyarko, Yaw (2011). “Social Safety Nets: The Role Of Education, Remittances And Migration,” with Kwabena Gyimah–Brempong and Klaus Hellwig, European Report on Development, European Union, Brussels.

Nyarko, Yaw (2011). “Review of African Household Survey Data on Social Safety-nets and the Role of Education, Remittances and Migration” with Kwabena Gyimah-Brempong and Klaus Peter-Hellwig, European Report on Development, European Union, Brussels.

Nyarko, Yaw and William Easterly (2009). “Is the Brain Drain Good for Africa?” in “Skilled Migration today: Prospect, Problems and Policies,” (eds) Jagdish Bhagwati and Gordon Hanson, Oxford University Press, USA.


Easterly 150x150William Easterly
Co-Director, NYU Development Research Institute (DRI)
Professor of Economics
Website: http://williameasterly.org

William Easterly is Professor of Economics at New York University, joint with Africa House, and Co-Director of NYU’s Development Research Institute, the 2009 winner of the BBVA Frontiers in Knowledge Award on Economic Development Cooperation. He is editor of Aid Watch blog, Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and Co-Editor of the Journal of Development Economics. He is the author of The White Man’s Burden: How the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good (Penguin, 2006), The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists’ Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics (MIT, 2001), 3 other co-edited books, and 59 articles in refereed economics journals. He received a B.A. from Bowling Green State University, and a Ph.D. in Economics from M.I.T. His areas of expertise are the determinants of long-run economic growth, the political economy of development, and the effectiveness of foreign aid. He has worked in most areas of the developing world, most heavily in Africa, Latin America, and Russia.

Publications

Easterly, William and Yaw Nyarko (2009). “Is the Brain Drain Good for Africa?” in “Skilled Migration today: Prospect, Problems and Policies,” (eds) Jagdish Bhagwati and Gordon Hanson, Oxford University Press, USA.


Lakshminarayanan Subramanian,
Associate Professor at Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at NYU
Website: cs.nyu.edu/~lakshmi/Home.html

Lakshminarayanan Subramanian is an Associate Professor in the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at NYU. His research interests are in the areas of networks, distributed systems and computing for development. He leads the Networks and Wide-Area Systems(NeWS) research group, and the CATER Lab at NYU. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award (2009), IBM Faculty Awards (2009, 2010), Google Faculty Award (2013), C.V. Ramamoorthy Award at UC Berkeley and Microsoft Research Challenge Award on “Cellphones for Healthcare” (2008).


Shing-Yi Wang

Shing-Yi Wang,
Assistant Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy at Wharton
Website: assets.wharton.upenn.edu/~was/

Shing-Yi Wang is an Assistant Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy at Wharton. She is also an affiliate of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD) and a research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). She received her Ph.D. in economics from Yale University and her B.A. from Wellesley College. Prior to joining Wharton, she was an assistant professor in the department of economics at New York University. She has also worked at the Federal Reserve Board and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Publications

Naidu, S., Y. Nyarko and S. Wang (2014). “Worker Mobility in a Global Labor Market: Evidence from the United Arab Emirates”. Working Paper.

Wang, Shing-Yi (2013). “Marriage Networks, Nepotism and Labor Market Outcomes in China” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 5(3), 91 – 112.

Wang, Shing-Yi (Working Paper), “Statistical Discrimination, Productivity and the Height of Immigrants”.


Natasha IskanderNatasha Iskander,
Associate Professor of Public Policy at NYU
Website: wagner.nyu.edu/iskander

Natasha Iskander, Associate Professor of Public Policy, conducts research on labor migration and economic development, on labor mobilization and its relationship to workforce development, and on processes of institutional innovation and organizational learning. Her recent award-wining book, entitled Creative State: Forty Years of Migration and Development Policy in Morocco and Mexico (Cornell University Press: 2010), examines how the governments of Mexico and Morocco elaborated policies to build a link between labor emigration and local economic development.

Her current project investigates how tacit skill moves across national borders through international migration, and the resource it represents for economic development. She has focused on Mexican migrants in the US and Mexican construction industries, and has now begun a project on processes of skill development among migrants in Qatar’s construction industry. Additionally, Dr. Iskander examines the impact on rapid rural-to-urban migration on the provision of urban water and sanitation, and its relationship to climate change.

Natasha Iskander received her PhD in Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She also holds a Masters in City Planning from MIT, and a BA in Cultural Studies from Stanford University. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked for several years in non-profits in Egypt and the United States on issues of urban development, micro credit and community health planning. She has also worked as a community activist and migrant labor organizer.

Publications

Iskander, N. (2013). “Moroccan Migrants as Unlikely Captains of Industry: Remittances, Financial Intermediation, and La Banque Centrale Populaire”  In S. Eckstein, ed. Immigrant Impact in their Homelands. Durham: Duke University Press.

Iskander, N. (2013). “Labor Migration and the Potential for Industrial Renewal”  In P. Osterman, ed. Economy in Society: Essays in Honor of Michael Piore. Cambridge: MIT Press.


Naidu1 150x150Suresh Naidu,
Assistant Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Columbia University/SIPA
Website: new.sipa.columbia.edu/faculty/suresh-naidu

Suresh Naidu is Assistant Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Columbia University/SIPA. He teaches economics, political economy and development. Naidu previously served as a Harvard Academy Junior Scholar at Harvard University, and as an instructor in economics and political economy at the University of California-Berkeley. Naidu holds a BMath from University of Waterloo, an MA in Economics from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and a PhD in Economics from the University of California-Berkeley. One strand of Naidu’s research has looked at the political economy of coercive labor markets in the post-bellum U.S. South and 19th century England. Another strand has looked at the economic incidence of political transitions, estimating the returns to landowners from black disenfranchisement in the late 19th century U.S. South and the asset price increases caused by CIA-sponsored coups.

Publications

Naidu, S., Y. Nyarko and S. Wang (2014). “Worker Mobility in a Global Labor Market: Evidence from the United Arab Emirates”. Working Paper.

Naidu, Suresh. “Recruitment Restrictions and Labor Markets: Evidence from the Post-Bellum U.S. South,” Journal of Labor Economics.


ThomKEPictureKevin Thom,
Assistant Professor of Economics at NYU
Website: https://files.nyu.edu/kt44/public/

Kevin Thom is an Assistant Professor of Economics at NYU. His research interests lie in applied microeconomics, labor economics, economics of immigration, and economics of health. He has conducted research on topics such as the migration experience and earnings in the Mexican labor market, agricultural shocks and the growth of the Mexican drug sector, and the relationship between education and smoking over the life cycle.  He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Johns Hopkins University.


Baah-Boateng 150pxWilliam Baah-Boateng,
Senior Lecturer of Economics at the University of Ghana
Website: http://www.ug.edu.gh/index1.php?linkid=604&sectionid=845&page=18

William Baah-Boateng is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics, University of Ghana and a Fellow of the International Institute for Advanced Studies (IIAS), an academic and research think tank based in Accra, Ghana. He holds PhD in Economics from the University of Ghana with coursework pursued in the Department of Economics, Harvard University. An economist with special focus on labor, his current work focuses on employment and unemployment, gender and poverty issues. He has authored a number of published research papers, including a book titled “Labor Market Discrimination in Ghana: A Gender Dimension”. He worked with Ghana’s Employment Ministry between 2007 and 2012 as Labor Advisor and has also consulted for a number of international organizations, including the International Labor Organization (ILO), the World Bank, African Development Bank (AfDB) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) and domestic institutions. Dr. Baah-Boateng is currently an Associate Editor of the Ghanaian Journal of Economics (GJE).

Publications

Baah-Boateng, William (2013). “Determinants of Unemployment in Ghana,” African Development Review, Vol. 25, No. 4, 385-399.

Baah-Boateng, William, P. Adjei, and A. D. Oduro (2013). “Determinants of Moonlighting in Ghana: an Empirical Investigation,” African Review of Economics and Finance, Vol. 4, No. 2, 176-202.

Baah-Boateng, William (2013). “Human Capital Development: the Case of Education as a Vehicle for Africa’s Economic Transformation,” Legon Journal of International Affairs and Diplomacy (LEJIAD), Vol. 7, No. 1, 31-55.